Kin // New York   Kin  is an ongoing personal project that explores notions of home and family, given and chosen. From a distance, it seeks to understand what connects us to a place and its people. But at its core, it’s mostly a way for me to viscerally consider my own concept of belonging in an expansive world. I started it during a time of big transition while hiding out with my family in upstate New York. That first summer, as a way to think differently and break from stale routines, I only shot with the camera I learned how to take pictures on, picked up decades earlier in high school.    I think often about how, despite its crucial ability to heal, time can feel criminal. Knowing it will only retreat further into the recesses of your mind - and that you’re powerless to stop the slipping - can break your heart into more pieces than you can count if you let it. The longer I spend shooting, the more I realize that my somewhat compulsive relationship with the still image is less about the camera or photography as a medium, and more an obsession with memory. Since I was a kid, my desired superpower has been the ability to  emotionally recall moments from the past as clearly as the present feels. I’ve come to understand that I document the world, in large part, as a way of visually hoarding memories, both collective and my own. This project, more than any other, is a manifestation of that desire.
       
     
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 Kin // New York   Kin  is an ongoing personal project that explores notions of home and family, given and chosen. From a distance, it seeks to understand what connects us to a place and its people. But at its core, it’s mostly a way for me to viscerally consider my own concept of belonging in an expansive world. I started it during a time of big transition while hiding out with my family in upstate New York. That first summer, as a way to think differently and break from stale routines, I only shot with the camera I learned how to take pictures on, picked up decades earlier in high school.    I think often about how, despite its crucial ability to heal, time can feel criminal. Knowing it will only retreat further into the recesses of your mind - and that you’re powerless to stop the slipping - can break your heart into more pieces than you can count if you let it. The longer I spend shooting, the more I realize that my somewhat compulsive relationship with the still image is less about the camera or photography as a medium, and more an obsession with memory. Since I was a kid, my desired superpower has been the ability to  emotionally recall moments from the past as clearly as the present feels. I’ve come to understand that I document the world, in large part, as a way of visually hoarding memories, both collective and my own. This project, more than any other, is a manifestation of that desire.
       
     

Kin // New York

Kin is an ongoing personal project that explores notions of home and family, given and chosen. From a distance, it seeks to understand what connects us to a place and its people. But at its core, it’s mostly a way for me to viscerally consider my own concept of belonging in an expansive world. I started it during a time of big transition while hiding out with my family in upstate New York. That first summer, as a way to think differently and break from stale routines, I only shot with the camera I learned how to take pictures on, picked up decades earlier in high school.

I think often about how, despite its crucial ability to heal, time can feel criminal. Knowing it will only retreat further into the recesses of your mind - and that you’re powerless to stop the slipping - can break your heart into more pieces than you can count if you let it. The longer I spend shooting, the more I realize that my somewhat compulsive relationship with the still image is less about the camera or photography as a medium, and more an obsession with memory. Since I was a kid, my desired superpower has been the ability to emotionally recall moments from the past as clearly as the present feels. I’ve come to understand that I document the world, in large part, as a way of visually hoarding memories, both collective and my own. This project, more than any other, is a manifestation of that desire.

KinbirdsbwWeb.jpg
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_03.JPG
       
     
tri_x14.jpg
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_05.JPG
       
     
_MG_5500BW.JPG
       
     
tri_x41.jpg
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_08.JPG
       
     
05710019a.JPG
       
     
239A7948bwWEB.jpg
       
     
05720036a.JPG
       
     
27900004.JPG
       
     
27910036A.JPG
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_14.JPG
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_15.JPG
       
     
tri_x38.jpg
       
     
05720021a.JPG
       
     
27900022.JPG
       
     
27900018.JPG
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_20.JPG
       
     
tri_x56.jpg
       
     
05710022a.JPG
       
     
05710023a.JPG
       
     
Kin_NewEd2020_24.JPG
       
     
27900006.JPG
       
     
hammock.jpg
       
     
239A8717bwWeb.jpg