Cannon Ball, North Dakota //  In early 2016, approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline - slated to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois - spurred months of peaceful protests adjacent to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Many saw the proposed pipeline as a threat to clean water and the tribe’s ancient burial grounds, an issue that brought rise to a national conversation on environmental racism, cultural appropriation and indigenous rights. By mid-summer, the camp had grown to thousands of people.  In early November, winter arrived in full, dumping almost 2 feet of snow on the encampment within a few days in the season’s first blizzard. The storm hit just before news that then President-elect Donald Trump indicated his support of completion of the pipeline.  The two-day blizzard drove out some of the more fair-weather protesters, but many began gearing up for the long haul, with plans to stay through the harsh Dakota winter.  Photographed for NPR
       
     
standingrock_site02.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site03.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site04.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site05.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site06.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site07.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site08.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site09.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site10.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site11.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site12.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site13.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site16.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site19.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site14.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site17.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site20.JPG
       
     
 Cannon Ball, North Dakota //  In early 2016, approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline - slated to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois - spurred months of peaceful protests adjacent to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Many saw the proposed pipeline as a threat to clean water and the tribe’s ancient burial grounds, an issue that brought rise to a national conversation on environmental racism, cultural appropriation and indigenous rights. By mid-summer, the camp had grown to thousands of people.  In early November, winter arrived in full, dumping almost 2 feet of snow on the encampment within a few days in the season’s first blizzard. The storm hit just before news that then President-elect Donald Trump indicated his support of completion of the pipeline.  The two-day blizzard drove out some of the more fair-weather protesters, but many began gearing up for the long haul, with plans to stay through the harsh Dakota winter.  Photographed for NPR
       
     

Cannon Ball, North Dakota //

In early 2016, approved construction of Energy Transfer Partners' Dakota Access Pipeline - slated to run from the Bakken oil fields in western North Dakota to southern Illinois - spurred months of peaceful protests adjacent to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. Many saw the proposed pipeline as a threat to clean water and the tribe’s ancient burial grounds, an issue that brought rise to a national conversation on environmental racism, cultural appropriation and indigenous rights. By mid-summer, the camp had grown to thousands of people.

In early November, winter arrived in full, dumping almost 2 feet of snow on the encampment within a few days in the season’s first blizzard. The storm hit just before news that then President-elect Donald Trump indicated his support of completion of the pipeline.

The two-day blizzard drove out some of the more fair-weather protesters, but many began gearing up for the long haul, with plans to stay through the harsh Dakota winter.

Photographed for NPR

standingrock_site02.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site03.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site04.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site05.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site06.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site07.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site08.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site09.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site10.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site11.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site12.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site13.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site16.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site19.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site14.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site17.JPG
       
     
standingrock_site20.JPG